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Current PhD Projects

Once completing the MRes component of the course, the students then continue on to their three-year PhD. Below you'll find details of each individuals project which many have extensive support from industrial partners.

The EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Ultra Precision also has a number of PhD students doing their studies in this area of manufacturing. Further details of these can be found here.


 

Machine learning for automated close-range photogrammetry

Close-range photogrammetry is an optical form measurement technique which relies on detecting and triangulating feature correspondances between a set of photographic images to create a 3D point cloud. Photogrammetry is an attractive form measurement technique due to the relative low cost of the components required when compared to competing technologies, such as fringe projection. The current measurement pipeline is, however, slow and dependant on user input.

Machine learning for automated close-range photogrammetry - Read More…

Metallisation of CNTs

This project is being completed in collaboration with Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFSOR) with the aim of developing metal – CNT (carbon nanotube) paper laminates optimised for use in anodes of high power microwave devices.

Metallisation of CNTs - Read More…

Microwave atmospheric plasma for surface energy modification and coating

This PhD project involves further development and characterisation of a MW plasma system for the ultra-precision engineering application, and particularly for the modification of surface energy of polymeric materials for manufacturing purposes.

Microwave atmospheric plasma for surface energy modification and coating - Read More…

Novel 3D printing technique for metal components using multiple energy beams.

Additive Manufacturing (AM) applied to the production of metal components by the melting of metal powders rely on expensive and lengthy methods. Well established technologies using Electron Beam (EBM) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM) currently steer a single or a limited number of beams to raster scan a bed of powder. These methodologies are relatively slow and expensive compared to conventional manufacturing techniques. They have limited production rates for obtaining high density, and high quality, functional components. Even though they are continuously increasing their performance they can only offer an increased throughput at a high cost, requiring multi-stage and post-processing operations. As an alternative, the simultaneous use of multiple laser beams can increase productivity, and reduce some of the issues found during processing of metal powders.

Novel 3D printing technique for metal components using multiple energy beams. - Read More…

Novel energy delivery techniques for laser additive manufacturing from metal powders

Industrial supply of additively manufactured medical components currently falls behind the market demand. This project is geared towards improving the production rate of specific additive parts by adapting the laser delivery to optimise for that particular part by avoiding inherent physical process limitations.

Novel energy delivery techniques for laser additive manufacturing from metal powders - Read More…

Novel Methods for Compact Readout of Silicon CMOS Quantum Dot Spin Qubits

Quantum computing has the potential to solve problems that are intractable using today’s classical computers, such as simulation of complex systems or large global optimisation problems. Important applications range from discovery of new medicines and functional materials to cryptography and data science. Such algorithms will require millions of quantum bits (qubits) to operate, making scalability a key consideration.

Novel Methods for Compact Readout of Silicon CMOS Quantum Dot Spin Qubits - Read More…

Novel plasma diagnostics for light-matter interactions

A main objective of the programme is to develop and implement a novel integrated plasma diagnostics tool by combining nN force measurements with high speed pulsed digital holography, laser-induced fluorescence and volumetric ion current analysis within a thermal vacuum chamber. The proposed system will be used to increase our understanding of new and existing energy transfer mechanisms where plasmas are concerned e.g. studying phenomena in laser-matter interactions.

Novel plasma diagnostics for light-matter interactions - Read More…

Ordered Nanomaterials for Electron Field Emission

Field emission describes the emission of electrons into vacuum under an applied electric field. Current x-ray sources are energy intensive and cumbersome. Clare’s project focusses on using carbon nanotubes and field emission to replace and improve current x-ray technologies.

Ordered Nanomaterials for Electron Field Emission - Read More…

Continuing my long project ensured I was ready to hit the ground running when I transitioned from MRes to PhD. 

Clare Collins, PhD