skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Research Projects

The Cranfield MRes students are offered a number of individual projects from supervisors who are willing to support these projects. The projects start in October and are completed in September. The project topics are spread across the field Ultra Precision engineering. Some time, the research project is spent at the sponsor location.

Through your research project, you will have the opportunity to work with industry in areas such as precision machine tools, reel-to-reel, metrology, plasma processing, and abrasive precision processes.

The academics of the Precision Engineering Institute will secure research projects for you either through the industrial partners or from existing research pursued at Cranfield University. The research project provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate independent research capability, the ability to think and work in an original way, contribute to knowledge, and solve real problems. You will select your research project in consultation with your supervisor.

By the end of the research project you will be able to demonstrate your research capability. You and your work will be assessed by appointed examiners.

Here are short abstracts of the projects conducted in 2017:

Feasibility Study of Composite and Multi-Modality Detector Materials, Aimal Mazidi

Radiation detector materials are core to many technologies spread across several industrial sectors such as medical imaging, security and energy physics. While the search for new scintillators has become increasingly sophisticated and successful in recent years, detector materials are not selected for their ability in answering application needs but chosen as a trade-off between requirements and availability. This project is part of a larger effort addressing the current and intrinsic limitations of detector materials by developing a novel family of highly modular heterostructure scintillator with the capability. Of particular interest is the development of heterostructure radiation detector materials as a high performance, ultra-fast and high stopping power alternative to the current Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET) detectors by merging 2 different scintillator; Lu2SiO5:Ce3+ (stopping power), and ZnO (sub-nanosecond time response). Toward this aim, this project, focuses on designing and optimising the heterostructure layout in term of light transport by functionalising the heterostructure surfaces (Lu2SiO5/ZnO interfaces and outer surfaces). This encompasses simulation of the light transport mechanisms of the heterostructure, establishment of surface costing material candidates. This project will also define the deposition techniques required to implement the coating.

Feasibility study of heterostructure radiation detector material- single crystal matrix, Karishma Dhanani

Radiation detector materials are core to many technologies spread across several industrial sectors. While the search for new scintillators has become increasingly successful in recent years; detector materials are not selected for their ability in answering application needs but chosen as a trade-off between requirements and availability. This project is part of a larger effort addressing the current and intrinsic limitations of detector materials by developing a novel family of highly modular heterostructure scintillator. Of particular interest is the development of a heterostructure radiation detector materials comprising of high performance, ultra-fast and high stopping power. This is an alternative to current Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET) detectors by merging two different scintillator; Lu2SiO5:Ce3+ (stopping power), and ZnO (sub-nanosecond time response). This project focuses on designing and optimising the heterostructure layout to maximise its stopping power and the ultra-fast time response contribution. In addition, the project will also define the processing techniques required to manufacture the heterostructure material.

New Manufacturing Technology for Fluid Film Bearings, Aroop Kumar Sen

The current manufacturing processes to study the tolerance requirements and materials that have been applied into the manufacturing of fluid film bearing systems. Research is conducted into finding an economical common ground for manufacturing for these fluid film (Liquid and Gas) externally pressurized bearing system. Two sets of bearing systems hydrostatic and aerostatic fluid film bearings would be manufactured to validate the feasibility of the manufacturing process.

On-machine metrology of diamond tool profile for SPDT, Andrew Dickins

Functional surfaces are used in a wide range of applications with mechanical and mechanic functionalities. Hydrophobocity of surfaces in particularly useful due to its potential in self cleaning and anti microbial use. This project aims to investigate the generation of geometric hydrophic surface structures through high precision micromilling to determine which topographies and structure features provide the best performance.

Selected area hot machining with a multi-tipped diamond tooling system, Ashley Dennis

Single point diamond turning (SPDT) is an ultra-precision micromachining process of cutting and shaping a material to a specified geometry. A key drawback is that diamonds are prone to wear and hence only short cutting lengths are attainable while cutting semiconductors and ceramics such as silicon and silicon carbide. The project focuses on overcoming the limitation of short track lengths achievable by a single point diamond cutting tool and offers a step-changing approach to the world of precision engineering. There are two standalone technologies which the project aims to integrate. The first is using multiple diamond tool tips mounted on a rotary cutter. The second technology is micro Laser assisted Machining, in which a laser is passed right through the transparent diamond, heating up the material being cut, making it more pliant. The project involves designing this newly proposed tooling concept, and developing the design strategy for installing this tooling system on an existing (but broken) machine tool, ‘Tetraform-C’, known for having the highest dynamic loop stiffness ever realised.

Smart Control System for Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets, Ludmil Petkov

A metre-scale optics plasma figuring machine requires a stable operation. Plasma is an ionised gas by extra energy, known as the fourth state of the matter. It is preferred in surface etching as it allows a contactless, substrate stress free treatment. An automated control system is researched which can reduce the downtime and make the machine more robust for industrial use. The dynamics of the chemical process will be governed more effectively. The polished to within nanometre optics of their shape are used as segments in large-scale telescopes.  The project will advance the manufacturing process of mirrors, deployed for space observations.

Studying the behaviour of Cu-Zr metallic glass during mechanical nanocutting using molecular dynamics, Fabian Duarte Martinez

Metallic glasses offer superior mechanical, electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with crystalline metal alloys and they have been considered for many micro and nano length scale applications. However, it is quite challenging to process these materials due to their metastable nature. The conventional approach has been to use thermoplastic forming but its control over dimensional precision and surface roughness are not ideal. For this reason, mechanical nanocutting offers an alternative approach to machining metallic glass components with high precision. The aim of this project is to study the effect of different cutting parameters and conditions on the atom trajectories, the cutting force and pile up characteristics in Cu-Zr metallic glasses during mechanical nanocutting using molecular dynamics.